Chemistry Nobel Prize : How ‘clicking’ molecules will change our lives

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the American Barry Sharpless and the Dane Morten Meldal for developing click chemistry.

For Sharpless, this is the second Nobel Prize. He received the first in 2001 for the creation of chiral catalysts for redox reactions used in the pharmaceutical industry.

It is a new principle for effectively connecting molecules, as well as to the American Caroline Bertozzi, who applied it to living cells.

“Meldal and Sharpless developed the basics of click chemistry, and Bertozzi figured out how to use it to sew labels to biological molecules and introduce them into cells,” explains Nechaev. “This is a universal, very effective tool for solving various problems in molecular biology and medicine.”

Read More :-

Meldal and Sharpless added monovalent copper as a catalyst, and the reaction began to proceed at temperatures close to room temperature, and approximately 107 times faster. Now this elegant and highly effective chemical process is used in the development of pharmaceuticals and modified organosynthetic materials, in DNA sequencing technologies, basic research on cell function and the creation of new biomolecules.

--

--

This is the platform where you can learn Chemistry in a easy way. We have lots of Study material about Chemistry. Chemistry lectures are based on CBSE syllabus.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Chemistry Page

This is the platform where you can learn Chemistry in a easy way. We have lots of Study material about Chemistry. Chemistry lectures are based on CBSE syllabus.